SCARS: MEANING, TYPES, PREVENTION, HOME REMEDIES, TREATMENT OF SCARS

SCARS: MEANING, TYPES, PREVENTION, HOME REMEDIES, TREATMENT OF SCARS post thumbnail image

WHAT IS A SCAR?

A scar tissue is a collection of cells and collagen that covers the site of the injury. People can develop scar tissue on their skin as the result of an injury, surgery, or acne. Other areas of the body can also develop scar tissue, such as the heart muscle after a heart attack.

 

TYPES OF SCAR

Scar tissue can present in a variety of ways, including:

 

  • A keloid is a raised, redskin colored plaque of scar tissue that can form on tissues after an injury. Keloids often appear on the upper chest, shoulders, and upper back.

 

  • A hypertrophic scar is a more common form of scar tissue. People with hypertrophic scars may notice that they fade over time.

 

  • A contracture scar Trusted Source usually occurs in tissues that have had a burn injury. These scars can impair the movement of the affected area.

 

THE BEST WAY TO PREVENT SCARRING

If you have cut yourself, the first thing you would want to do is to minimize inflammation or further trauma to the skin, Here’s how to lessen your chances of scarring:

 

  • Clean the wound. As soon as you’re injured, clean the affected area with soap and water to get rid of any bacteria and prevent infection.
  • Keep it moist and covered. You might’ve grown up learning to keep cuts dry, but the opposite is true. “Keeping it moist is best to prevent a scar,” Dr. Khetarpal says. Use petroleum jelly on your wound, and bandage it up to let it heal.
  • Avoid bacitracin. Resist the temptation to apply topical ointment, as 8% of people are actually allergic to it — which can further inflame the area and increase the likelihood of scarring.
  • Minimize movement. “Every time the scar moves, it’s going to alter the formation for a wider or thicker scar,” Dr. Khetarapal says. Give your wound time to heal by not overexerting the injured area.
  • Leave those scabs alone: Scabs are our skin’s natural bandages, so keep your fingers off of them and let them do their thing. Picking will only prolong your injury and keep it from healing. Think you’re picking at scabs in your sleep? Purchase a pair of cotton gloves to wear to bed.
  • In summary, Dr. Khetarapal says, “The bottom line is don’t let it crust up, keep it moist, keep it clean, keep it covered, and minimize tension.”

 

HOME REMEDIES FOR SCARS

There’s limited medical evidence supporting the idea that potatoes can help with scars. But one 2017 study found that potato peel may help heal minor burns.

 

Lemon

There’s no solid medical evidence that lemon can help scars.

One 2018 study on mice found that topical application of lemon oil helped to reduce skin inflammation and skin damage in mice.

 

Lavender and olive oil

Research suggests that lavender essential oil could help with wound healing. One 2016 study trusted Source on rats found that the surface area of wounds topically treated with lavender oil was significantly decreased when compared with that of the control group.

 

Apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has been shown to help with preventing acne scars. One 2014 study trusted Source attributed this to the succinic acid present in ACV. Succinic acid can control inflammation caused by acne, which in turn may prevent scars from forming. Others may include Coconut oil, Honey, Vitamin E, and Aloe Vera.

 

TREATMENT OF SCARS

Skin camouflage (make-up)

Silicone gels or sheets

Steroids

Laser therapy

Cryotherapy

Dermal fillers

Skin needling

Surgery

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